my silences had not protected me

39 Pieces Of Advice For Journalists And Writers Of Color

ethiopienne:

this is everything

Via Merf. Thinking is Hard.


foxmouth:

Landscapes, 2014 | by Anthony Samaniego

Via Note-a-bear


ethiopienne:

yes, yes, and more yes. white folks looking to be in solidarity with PoC, take notes!

(Source: ethiopienne)



punwitch:

soradiesinkh3:

This about sums it up.

lmao friend with “benefits”


Via Some Kind Of Social Justice Bullshit


(Source: fatgirlinohio)


Jews went into Auschwitz and came out as Jews. Africans went into the ships and came out as Blacks. The former is a Human holocaust; the latter is a Human and and metaphysical holocaust.

Frank Wilderson, Red, Black, and White: Cinema and the Structure of US Antagonisms (via so-treu)

Umm yeah that is really interesting but the way this is worded kind of makes it sound like the shoah wasn’t as bad as african slavery which is not okay don’t compare those things

(via jamieisahurricane)

see the bolded? is exactly what i was talking about when i said what folks REAL objection to this quote is. that this could be a possibility, that Black folks suffered something that no one else, not even Jews suffered, makes a lot of folks *real* uncomfortable. and given how Black suffering is deemed illegitimate and unintelligible, i really think this comparison actually helps to make it if not legitimate, but intelligible in some way, and that makes a lot of non-Black people REALLY uncomfortable.

(via so-treu)

But it’s true tho. And we won’t talk about the holocausts methods being used on Black Africans first. And those techniques were shared and developed with whites from the U.S. and are still used to this day on Black people (most recent incident being mostly black women prisoners being sterilized against their will as recently as 2010 aka eugenics). Plus really what are we? Can you tell me? We weren’t just African, since Africa is a huge continent. we were millions upon millions of african peoples with different ethnicities and nationalities and customs and backgrounds.we were a lot of different ethnicities and religions we will never know. We are from so many places we will never see and even know are part of us. Now we are black black American African American negro nigger etc. puhlease.

(via strugglingtobeheard)

The Nazis borrowed the idea of eugenics from America, btw.

And non-black people’s issue with this quote isn’t about taking anything away from black people. From a Jewish and Rromani perspective, everything being compared to the Holocaust is a subtle way of minimizing it. It’s not all a giant “white whine”, there are real perspectives being ignored here.

Read this response by big-gadje-world if you want to get a sense of what I’m talking about.

(via brainstatic)

erm, yes, we know that Nazi’s borrowed eugenics from America. that’s exactly what strugglingtobeheard said in their comment. and no one used the words “white whine.” did you read anything anyone actually said?

and i’m not gonna trust big-gadje-world on anything historical, after she once accused Black people of enslaving Romani people en masse in both the U.S. and the Caribbean, and accused Black ppl of being racist after they pointed out that the sources that she used disproved her own argument. and never apologized.

and no one’s comparing “everything” to the Holocaust. the author, Wilderson (and this is two sentences taken from an entire book so there are obvously layers missing here), is ultimately expounding upon Frantz Fanon’s reading of the Holocaust as a thing that, as awful as it was, still didn’t visit upon Jews the absolute obliteration of Self and Humanity that it did for Blacks. like he’s literally saying here that yes, IT IS INEXACT AND IMPROPER TO  COMPARE WHAT BLACKS WENT THROUGH TO THE HOLOCAUST. all these people mad as this quote are not realizing that he’s AGREEING with them. but he’s saying that because to compare what Blacks went through to the Holocaust is to trivialize/understate what Blacks have gone through, and that’s a REAL issue that everyone is having with this quote. because i have yet to hear someone, besides the author, who has an objection to the comparison saying “don’t compare the Holocaust to slavery because it trivializes SLAVERY,” and i think that’s very telling.

(via so-treu)

[content warning for graphic discussion of slavery]

Reblogging for commentary and to think about later.

Also, the first time I read big-gadje-world’s commentary, it bothered me but I couldn’t quite figure out why because I really wasn’t in a head space to ponder it. But I think it’s because it’s written as if these things didn’t and haven’t continued to happen to Black folks during and post slavery.

We know that enslaved Black folks were used in fucked up experiments and continue to be used in fucked up experiments. We know that enslaved Black folks were burned, scarred, whipped, beaten, raped, tortured, had our children used for target practice, killed just because white folks knew they could get away with it, and so on. We know that over 20,000 plantations existed during the height of slavery. And we know that millions upon millions of Black bodies line the ocean bottom and have fertilized millions of acres of land throughout this world.

And also, and part of me wants to apologize for the bluntness of this statement, but have Black folks (Jewish, Romani, etc.) ever had a humanity to be shattered?

(via glitterlion)

the bolded. and that’s Wilderson’s ultimate point in both this book and the general thrust of his work, Blacks are not only seen as not-Human, we are seen as ANTI-Human. we were introduced to Modernity/transformed from Africans into THINGS, things that you buy and sell, commodities that are fungible (if you lose a pen or some other object you bought, you simply buy another to replace it; if you lost a Black, during slavery, you simply bought another Black to replace it) and can be accumulated. And Saidiya Hartman, whose work Wilderson also draws on, points out in Lose Your Mother that Black Death is *incidental death.* unlike the Holocause, we didn’t even have the dignity of being of being targeted for death, who tries to wipe out a commodity? our death was collateral damage. our death was a thing that happened as a mater of the marketplace functioning properly. we weren’t a human population to be wiped out, we were a thing that made other people money. we WERE money. who mourns the death of a commodity? 

(via so-treu)

fucking thank you. and yea, that point about people saying comparing the holocaust to slavery trivializes the holocaust rather than seeing it the other way or viewing any of the numerous points being made before… well yea. let that shit sink in. cause it’s all been done and more and still being done and i guess yea, who mourns a commodity, this is commonplace. memories and recollections mean more than actually still living through that and trying to articulate it.

(via strugglingtobeheard)

But I think it’s because it’s written as if these things didn’t and haven’t continued to happen to Black folks during and post slavery.

It’s just you see we had all this extra shit happen to us as well. Why does no one want to hear about or acknowledge the extra? Does it take away from your focus on you? We are a part of you. We were ashes and bones and torment, and that quote expounds upon that in that this is notably absent. You want to defend against “the blacks” having something being about addressing what happened to them, while  (and via) not including them in your works. And no one wants to do this:

because i have yet to hear someone, besides the author, who has an objection to the comparison saying “don’t compare the Holocaust to slavery because it trivializes SLAVERY," and i think that’s very telling.

Because we’re at the bottom of the ocean, too. 10s of Millions. This is why “came out” cannot be taken literally; it’s talking about those who survived. 11 million enslaved, kidnapped Africans conservatively are estimated to lie at the bottom of the ocean.

And no one hears of it. We don’t know who they were, or where they were from except “Africa.” We were stolen and forced to the Americas and West Indies and the countries the slavers saw fit and we had our EVERYTHING stolen from us. We came out black. Well, actually, no, we demanded “black.” Before it was just colored and negro (among others). We have no country, and we’d have no continent if they had their way. (As in, we wouldn’t know we were stolen from Africa). We didn’t have a choice; we didn’t immigrate, we were stolen.

We entered as human beings with an identity, religion, language, and culture, family, specific looks, and we came out as- “black.” But we came out with a name that doesn’t unite us in any respect except a shared dehumanization struggle that isn’t even enough to keep us from hurting our own. We are black because everything was taken from us. A color for our name, for our entire identity. A color is our language.

The point of that quote is that those are atrocities. Both of them.

It isn’t trying to minimize or place one as right. One left those scarred members who survived as someone to the world, someone to be mourned and recognized as murdered, and someone to each other; leaving under an identity and those who survived were known to the world as that same identity. Identity, and through that, an identity recognizable to themselves and their community. Assuming they did not have to then pass, or find some other way to leave it behind because they were not white in the countries they traveled to. This quote is not minimizing that. To say that something is a great atrocity on this level, and to acknowledge that another is also a great atrocity on yet another level is not a subtraction.

The other changed who those people were on a fundamental level; they had no nation, language, identity, community except a shared suffering.  There is no place they can go to get that back. As a group, an entire group, not just individually valid experiences, but metaphyiscally and spiritually valid experiences. We say these words because it is a wash that can’t just touch the body, it touches us in society, everywhere we go. We can’t say, “I am black, and this is where I’m from, down to the country, language, people.”

You still get to be that; and yes there are people who will make attempts on your humanity for being on another axis of oppression (in this case Jewish, and antisemitism attacking your humanity), this quote does not erase that. Actually, it outright states that this is a thing that happened. All it does is say that SOMEONE TOOK THIS FURTHER to someone else. Someone did MORE (I won’t say worse, because again the whole point is that these are atrocities). It is saying that the former is what we call The Holocaust, and why. It is saying this latter not only challenged the humanity of people on a physical level, but on a metaphysical level in that it erased an entire people yet kept them living. Kept them creating more people to be born dead in the eyes of society and worked. We can’t get that back. We experienced one thing, and it was taken further. They kill you one way, and then they find a way to keep you dead but still living. For chattel slavery. That only ended (officially) within three generations. That lasted for 300+ years.

11-15 million at the bottom of the ocean conservatively. It is saying we went in as a people with a history, and came out only and exactly what they made us. You still have a name. You still have something to reach back to. If all you have is black, black is all you have.

because i have yet to hear someone, besides the author, who has an objection to the comparison saying “don’t compare the Holocaust to slavery because it trivializes SLAVERY," and i think that’s very telling.

Other points I want to reiterate:

And also, and part of me wants to apologize for the bluntness of this statement, but have Black folks (Jewish, Romani, etc.) ever had a humanity to be shattered?

For those lost, this is saying that black people are included amongst Jewish and Rromani. This is not a minimization of suffrage. This is an acknowledgment that when we say “shattered,” we mean we had nothing in the eyes of anyone (even ourselves), they took everything in a way that was so sick that it lasts to this day.

  Blacks are not only seen as not-Human, we are seen as ANTI-Human. we were introduced to Modernity/transformed from Africans into THINGS,

And Saidiya Hartman, whose work Wilderson also draws on, points out in Lose Your Mother that Black Death is *incidental death.* unlike the Holocaust, we didn’t even have the dignity of being of being targeted for death, who tries to wipe out a commodity? our death was collateral damage. our death was a thing that happened as a mater of the marketplace functioning properly. we weren’t a human population to be wiped out, we were a thing that made other people money. we WERE money. who mourns the death of a commodity?

(via shadow-sass)

this is really brilliant commentary/writing, Tala.

(via so-treu)

Via Where can i go?

blueklectic:

marxvx:

assdownloader:

"don’t support nestle!" shouts the liberal on the computer made from parts manufactured at foxconn

consumer activism is a lie, see you in hell or in communism

lmao try boycotting a brand in monopoly capitalism

image

Damn

imo the exception to this is when workers call for a boycott.

Via Wild Spirit, which art moving everywhere

allyhatingheterophobe:

People who think I don’t already “pick my battles” greatly underestimate the number of potential battles in my path on a daily basis.

(Source: allyhatingcisphobe)

Via Where can i go?

fatgirlinohio:

Mark Harris is the best about constantly pointing out gender (and minority) discrimination in the language of film/TV criticism.


Via Note-a-bear

cishettears:

liberal feminism more like “capitalism: it’s not just for boys”

Via Note-a-bear

zuky:

1943 social media activism. The same year this ad was published, the Chinese Exclusion Act was formally repealed — primarily because the US needed China as an ally against Japan in World War II. But severe anti-Chinese immigration restrictions remained in place until 1965.



leafsfeelings:

choptail:

*SLAMS REBLOG BUTTON*

HIT REBLOG SO GODDAMN FAST

(Source: htkfr)


if there is one thing radicals/progressives/liberals have failed to get right in the new age

the-goddamazon:

parteira:

bankuei:

navigatethestream:

its the notion of boycotts

you wanna know why the bus boycotts of the civil rights movement were so successful?

because an alternative black run transportation system was created for those who couldn’t walk to work or whatever they had to go

they didn’t just tell people “oh the bus enforces racist policies so don’t take it and FUCK if you can’t get to work on time or where you need to be!” 

they said “hey you’re paying to get on the bus and not even being given a seat let alone being ejected if a white passenger needs your seat. here’s a potentially better alternative where you pay to sit down and get to where you need to go” 

all this “boycott Target, Walmart, Monsanto owned companies” comes from a notion of boycott located in the politic of privileged white people

and that’s why they are largely unsuccessful

its why Obama just gave Monsanto the green light to commit even more fuckery to your food

its the reason why cooperation are considered people

its the reason why Walmart is allowed to usurp safety and labor regulations in their factories, and underpay their American workers

because you say “don’t spend your money there” and that’s the end of the story 

you expect people to locate their survival in a politic of “abstaining from unethical choices”

and then from there those unethical choices are somehow supposed to magically disappear. when really only a small percentage of people are able to boycott so many things

there wouldn’t be a movement located around the “99%” if 99% of people could really afford to stop shopping at the unethical places and stop buying the unethical brands

good luck with your hocus pocus activist logic 

AND that the boycotts were organized with enough concentrated numbers relative to the area being pressured to affect the economy.

AND that boycotts also came with specific demands for legal policy change upon specific authorities.   Lawyers were helping draft best plans of action based on establishing precedent.

Unified messages were created and plans were made for publicizing those messages so that when the white general populace started to see the difference and inconvenience when those boycotts kicked in, they’d know EXACTLY what was being asked of them.

Plans were laid for boycotts months ahead - not only were alternative means set up, plans were laid out for what it would look like in the long haul for a lot of people.  Plans were made for what they’d have to do in the face of backlash - beatings, arrests, white mob violence, lynchings, police abuse, etc.

The difference, of course, is that all of this is about organizing and acting as a movement, instead of just shilling consumer activism…

Of course, the other half of this kind of ignorance is because of raw anti-blackness.   These folks just imagine “Well, the Black people did it, so it can’t be that hard…” and come so unprepared and shoddy with it. 

sobbing because this is everything yes

White liberals love co-opting the Civil Rights Movement and its associated buzz words but not knowing how the shit works.

Via The Goddamazon

taiyyaba:

thisismybyline:

depressednmoderatelywelldressed:

startedwellthatsentence:

globalpost:

BANGKOK, Thailand — They materialize suddenly, by the dozens, raising a three-finger salute toward the sky. Then they vanish as quickly as they appear, melting into crowds to evade scores of armed troops and police.

They are Bangkok’s anti-coup flash mobs. Under Thailand’s new military junta, which seized power from an elected government in late May, protesting the armed takeover is a crime.

Those daring enough to defy the coup have been reduced to cat-and-mouse games — swift public demonstrations designed to evaporate before police or soldiers can haul off offenders.

The flash mobs’ three-finger salute is inspired by The Hunger Games, the popular science-fiction series depicting a futuristic totalitarian regime. In The Hunger Games series, dissent toward a cruel dictatorship is signaled by raising three fingers; in Bangkok, the salute draws an unflattering comparison to the real-life junta that just seized power.

Bangkok’s anti-coup flash mobs have adopted the ‘Hunger Games’ salute

Photos by AFP/Getty Images

Read More


Via apparently i tumblr now


rabbitglitter:

This is how you know White people are responsible for the definitions in dictionaries. 

Malcolm X dictionary scene


Via Wild Spirit, which art moving everywhere

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